Tag Archives: delivery

“Designing Delivery: Rethinking IT in the Digital Service Economy” by Jeff Sussna

When I recommended Designing Delivery: Rethinking IT in the Digital Service Economy on Twitter, Jeff asked me to explain why I thought it was valuable. Jeff’s book deals with a complex subject matter and he considers a broad range of different aspects. While this makes this book valuable, it makes writing a meaningful review difficult. For what it’s worth, here we go:

Confirmation bias — well, an ego boost

From a very superficial perspective, Designing Delivery makes me feel good as it confirms a few things I’ve been having hunches about for a while. This includes a broader and more proactive role for testing & quality assurance in lean & agile initiatives and organizations, a focus on product management rather than project management, an extension of devops ideas to business operations, an emphasis on designing & managing services (or service-dominant logic) and, more recently, seeking to combine agile development and design thinking.

Unfortunately, my thinking hasn’t been as thorough, consistent and coherent as Jeff’s. I haven’t foreseen all of this years ago — on the contrary, compared to this book, my thinking barely scratched the surface…if you look really hard, you can even see some marks.

Cybernetics

Cybernetics form the backbone of Jeff’s work in this book. I finally got the memo on cybernetics earlier this year and worked through Donella Meadows’ Thinking in Systems: A Primer. Yes, I know I’m late to the party…

Jeff introduces fundamental cybernetic concepts and applies them to software and, more generally, digital services in a very practical and approachable way. These cybernetic concepts helped me to talk and reason about behaviours I’ve seen at work and elsewhere in life. This, in turn, provides a basis for effecting change in these systems.

No software is an island

While software undoubtedly is essential to most businesses today, discussing software in isolation is insufficient: software needs to be considered in the context of the services it helps to deliver. Jeff provides a good introduction to service-dominant logic and how it applies to the digital service economy. In addition to customer-related concerns, Jeff discusses other people in the enterprise (especially employees and service providers) as well as organisational concerns. It is unsurprising that Dave Gray’s The Connected Company has a guest apperance.

It all comes together

Jeff brings together several schools of thoughts or practices that are hugely important today. In particular, Jeff shows that cybernetics (or systems thinking) and design thinking cannot only coexist peacefully but can actually be combined to yield even greater value. Furthermore, he shows how design thinking has an essential role to play in the fuzzy front-end of lean & agile software development processes. Jeff brings devops into the mix and shows how it can be relevant beyond software (i.e. service operations, business operations). He calls for operations to become an input to the design process and thereby completes the loop of designing, developing, delivering and operating software-supported services.

A crucial point in this book is Jeff’s call for a broader and more pro-active role of quality assurance in this context. He calls for a quality advocacy role that needs to go far beyond software development: indeed, quality advocacy needs to help the entire organization to deliver the right services to the right people — both inside and outside the company.

Many IT organizations are facing formidable challenges today. In Designing Delivery Jeff Sussna envisages a future for them in the digital service economy and shares his thoughts on how they can develop toward this new role.

That’s it for now

This blog post is only a start and is necessarily biased. It certainly doesn’t do Jeff’s book justice. As my thinking becomes clearer, I might update it in the future.

 

 

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